2 COMMENTS

  1. I don’t think this is right at all. Most indoor cats live to be 15, sure. But 15 is NOT comparable to 76 at all (following this scale). Compare an indoor cat to a human that has stayed indoors their entire life and you’d see something like 55; a good age for a human to start having cholesterol problems or kidney problems because they don’t eat or exercise properly. Many owners like to put their pet down when expensive medication comes into the picture as well, lowering the average lifespan. So what would be a better picture? For starters, it is really easy for a cat to hit 20y when it is in a safe outdoor environment (living in the middle of no-where or on farm, or even in a very low trafic / low populated neighbourhood). Living partly outdoors provides the cat with its necessary exercise and a better diet. And the oldest living cats who are all at the end of their 30s, are partly (if not entirely) outdoor cats. The oldest living humans? Reach 120y. So a proper scaling should include 40:120 or 39:122 to be more precise (comparing oldest cat ever to oldest human ever).
    I’d suggest to look this over again. It is definitely more complicated than one may think. (especially seeing the calculator stop at 17y. That made me choke a little x’D )

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